NATGEO ASİA

İNSTAGRAM

Feeding your curiosity through authentic imagery and inspiring stories on science, exploration and adventure.

View this post on Instagram

Caption by @acornandassociates | Photos by @madfacefoodweek Mad Face Food Week is an annual 3-day gathering serving up a fresh perspective on the Bangkok eating scene—one not overly focused on awards and “best of” lists but on creativity, community, and characters. As such, the food festival has seen its fair share of truly mad moments: a fin-to-tail kuro-maguro feast on a moving boat; a whole spit-roasted crocodile whose meat was carved and served as a hotdog; nine courses by nine chefs improvising in an ad hoc outdoor kitchen; and all kinds of cuisine mash-ups that would make a purist cringe. When we and event founder Vudi Somboonkulavudi began planning for Mad Face 2020 in the summer of 2019, little did we know that our theme—“Last Meal on Earth”—would become so eerily apt. As our March 2020 dates rolled around, we decided, after much difficult deliberation, to press on as planned. Though guests attendance was understandably low, our chefs and vendors did their best to keep vibes positive. It was a surreal three days, punctuated by (too much) great food and culminating in a storm—an actual storm—that tore through the festival grounds in the early AM of our final day. Harrowing, to say the least. The next day, the Thai government announced the official ban on public gatherings and ordered the closure of all bars and restaurants for the entire month of April (and now, possibly May) It may not have been the “Last Meal on Earth” per se, but Mad Face 2020 was indeed a last supper of sorts: the last time we’d all be able to gather, share food, eat off the same plate, and embrace one another…at least for now. For now, Bangkok’s chef and food communities remain hopeful, lending a (freshly washed) hand wherever we can. #CreateHope

A post shared by National Geographic Asia (@natgeoasia) on

View this post on Instagram

Caption, images & video by @lillysedaghat . “Your body is a container for your emotions, your experiences, your physical organs,” shares Alisha, a Taiwanese-American dance movement therapist. . “Movement is a form of healing—it’s about developing a relationship with your body to work through trauma.” . For the last 4 years, Alisha has worked with refugees, kids, and adults to process and heal through movement. . “I’d never been so close to suffering every before,” she shares about her patients. “It’s a job that takes a lot out of you, but it wouldn’t be sustainable if the passion to help people heal didn’t exist.” . Until mid-March, Alisha was working at a hospital seeing patients. Now, since the stay-at-home order, she’s moved to hosting virtual sessions. . “My hope is found in the little things right now—the color of the leaves, the swirls of tree trunks, the resilience of the kids I work with. I think it’s okay to offer reprieve momentarily in a time of fear and grief; we all need to recuperate. . “I’ve been hearing a lot about people talking about going back to normal. But things won’t necessarily snap back in the way we think it will. . “This pandemic is a huge trauma and trauma creates a break of how we experience life. So be gentle to yourself. The pace of the transition back is different for everyone.” #createhope — Cover Photo: Alisha dancing along the shores of Taitung, Taiwan. . Video 2 | Photo 3: Alisha engages in dance movement therapy as part of a project for her Masters degree.

A post shared by National Geographic Asia (@natgeoasia) on

View this post on Instagram

We need to take plastic off the menu. . The impact of single-use plastic waste on our lives is more alarming than ever. 15 of the 20 most-polluted rivers are in Asia. We account for about half the plastic waste that flows from land into the ocean; that waste includes single-use household plastic items such as bottles, straws, cups, lids, and cutleries. Abandoned fishing nets account for another 10% of the waste in our oceans. Some 700 species of marine animals have either eaten plastic or become entangled in it. Scientists have found microplastics in over 100 aquatic species, with more than half of that ending up on our dinner plates. These facts are troubling, but this is a problem we can all do something about. We have the power to choose, to respond, and to change. Choose to get involved in policy changes in your country. Respond to your community’s efforts in reducing plastic waste. Change your attitude towards the single-use plastic items in your daily life. The time is now for a united global response to the plastic crisis. We leave you with the famous words from National Geographic Explorer @lillysedaghat – “People have power. The power to make decisions, the power to inspire people, the power to change the world.” . Drive the change. Take the pledge. 🌏 Pledge Link in Bio #PlanetorPlastic #IChoosePlanet . This video is a creative visualization by National Geographic Asia.

A post shared by National Geographic Asia (@natgeoasia) on

Bir cevap yazın